Advanced Diploma in Transactional Analysis

Introduction | Objectives of the Advanced Diploma | Counselling Core Competencies | Education core competencies | Education core competencies | Psychotherapy core competencies | Scoring for the Written Examination | Overview of the Advanced Diploma oral examination in Transactional Analysis

Introduction

In the South Asian region professional training and certification in Transactional Analysis has been in line with the international processes, where the first level of certification in a specific field of application (counselling, education, organisational, psychotherapy) is Certified Transactional Analyst (CTA) and usually takes 4 or 5 years to complete. In order to provide milestones along this journey and also to cater to those looking for shorter training and certification, SAATA provides two intermediate certifications. They are:

Diploma in Transactional Analysis (For application of Transactional Analysis to self in personal and professional contexts)

Advanced Diploma in Transactional Analysis (For application of Transactional Analysis to clients in the chosen field of application)

These intermediate certifications could be an end in themselves for those who are looking for knowledge and skills for use in personal and professional contexts. They will also provide consolidation, evaluation, affirmation and motivation on the journey towards CTA which certifies for professional application in the chosen field.

The trainees may have

  • diverse backgrounds and varying degrees of prior exposure to self and professional development and to Transactional Analysis
  • different identities and goals, as they may be working towards Diploma, Advanced Diploma and/or CTA

Therefore the groups may have changing memberships, particularly at more advanced levels of training. The design of the programmes has been made keeping these factors in mind.

Objectives of the Advanced Diploma

  • To provide for experiential learning, understanding and application of Transactional Analysis to clients and client systems.
  • To encourage application of the understanding to self, with reference to the interpersonal space with the client / client systems.
  • To foster an attitude of professionalism, quality and ethical practice to the application of Transactional Analysis
  • To develop the ability to select appropriate theoretical frameworks and apply them to client situations, including diagnosis and interventions.
  • To promote the individual’s problem solving skills and develop the ability to approach complex issues from a variety of perspectives
  • To foster a commitment to ongoing study that will include current developments
  • To assist in the development of independent learning skills to enable trainees to approach new issues and topics with confidence
  • To facilitate an understanding and working within the field of specialisation and boundaries of the fields and levels of certification
  • To increase the depth and breadth of understanding core Transactional Analysis concepts with a focus on the field of specialisation
  • To train in skills of listening, rapport building, contracting, diagnosis and treatment/intervention planning
  • To develop the ability to evaluate, compare and critique theoretical frameworks in order to draw upon and choose from a wide range of potential interventions
  • To apply the knowledge and skills in the field of specialisation under supervision
  • To increase cultural awareness and the ability to perceive the area of specialisation in a broader perspective
    • To further personal awareness, growth and change

For those continuing to the CTA level of qualification

  • Undertake a substantial piece of independent work
  • Present this in writing, including demonstrating a high level of self and client analysis
  • Produce evidence of a range of interventions in which clients achieve greater autonomy through the application of Transactional Analysis
  • Develop the ability to discuss theory and application

Requirements

Diploma Advanced Diploma CTA Remarks
(Hours in addition to those required for diploma) (Total as specified by ITAA) Hours inclusive of those required for diploma and advanced diploma
Training hours 120 (must be TA) 300 (must be TA) 600 (300 must be TA) Theoretical inputs, practical demonstrations, skills training, discussions, etc.
Supervision hours 8 of which 5 must be with their primary supervisor 100 supervision hours out of which at least 50 must be with a TSTA or PTSTA and 30 must be with their primary supervisor 150 (75 must be TA-based; 40 must be with primary supervisor)

 

Includes active presentation individually or in groups for feedback, confrontation, discussion
Application hours On self and interpersonal interactions (no specified hours – appropriateness to be assessed by their primary supervisor) 350 (in TA)

Application to client / client systems (in chosen field of specIalisation

 

 

750 (500 in TA) client contact in field of specialisation
Additional hours (TA or nonTA) 72 as agreed with their primary supervisor 250 as agreed with their primary supervisor 500 as agreed with their primary supervisor Inclusive of personal psychotherapy
Total hours 200 1000 2000
Written Exam to be submitted to SAATA Written exam as specified in the SAATA Diploma Training & Examination Handbook Written and oral exam as specified in the ITAA Training & Examination Handbook (With changes as in SAATA Advance Diploma T&E Handbook Written and oral exam as specified in the ITAA Training & Examination Handbook Details described below

Significance & purpose of defining Core Competencies

  • Aligning it to a standardised level of certification offered
  • The core competencies formulated for each field will guide trainers, trainees and examiners in following the required training curriculum.
  • To use language and terms that will be understandable by trainees, trainers of the SAATA region
  • To articulate the knowledge, attitudes and skills expected from a practitioner in that field, at the level of the SAATA adv diploma holder.
  • Aligning it to the context of SAATA countries

Brief description of each field

The theory and practice of TA is applied in four different areas – called the fields of specialization. It is possible to undertake training and certification in each of these fields. The four fields are counselling, education, organizations and psychotherapy.

  • The counselling field of specialization: TA counselling is a professional activity within a contractual relationship. The counselling process enables clients or client systems to develop awareness, options and skills for problem management and personal development in daily life through the enhancement of their strengths, resources and functioning. Its aim is to increase autonomy in relation to their social, professional and cultural environment.
  • The education field of specialization is for people who work in the area of learning and study in pre-school, school and university contexts. It is also concerned with the support of child, adolescent and adult learners within the family, the institution or society. The work may be applied to the development of teaching teams and institutions. The aim is to further personal and professional growth, both scholastic and social.
  • The organizations field of specialization is for practitioners who work in or for organizations, taking into account organizational frames of reference and contexts as well as the organization’s development. The aim is the development, growth and increased effectiveness of people working within organizations.
  • The psychotherapy field of specialization is for practitioners who aim to facilitate the client’s capacity for self-actualization, healing and change. The psychotherapeutic process enables the client to recognize and change archaic, self-limiting patterns ‘to deal with the pain of the past in the present so that they are free to live their lives in the future’. The aim is for clients to understand themselves and their relationships and create options to live their lives in an aware, creative and spontaneous way.

General core competencies, common to all four fields

Irrespective of the field of application, the general core competencies articulate the knowledge, attitudes and skills that are expected from practitioners of Transactional Analysis in the SAATA region.

General Requirements:

  • A TA practitioner will demonstrate the following abilities
  • Understanding of TA theory and its application to the field (Psychotherapy / Counselling / Education / Organisation) with individuals and with couples, families, groups and organisations, as appropriate.
  • Knowledge of the ITAA (SAATA) Code of Ethics and demonstrate ethical and professional competence in practice, including working within the legal requirements governing the field, in the region of practice.
  • Capacity to assess the client / client system and make an informed decision about accepting to work with client / client systems. This also includes having the competency and an up-to-date knowledge of field specific theories and processes. Recognise personal limitations and the limitations of the field-specific practice in the context of the autonomy of client / client systems involved.
  • Ability to locate TA within the wider field of the specialisation.
  • Awareness of the significance and implications of cultural and social diversity and 
difference within and outside the consulting practice and context.
  • Awareness of the significance and implications of the SAATA exam process with reference to the ITAA exam process.

Personal attributes

  • Demonstrate a commitment to the philosophy of TA in such qualities as a belief in the capacity of the individual to take responsibility for him/herself, understanding an individual’s ways of being, and responding to an individual’s ability to grow and change.
  • Have a willingness to think ethically and be available for ethically intimate contact, including the practice of appropriate self-disclosure.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to ongoing personal and professional development, specifically the development of autonomy, including the capacity for awareness, spontaneity, and intimacy such that interventions are free of any pathological script elements.
  • Use intuition and creativity in response to the situation.
  • Show understanding of strengths and limitations of personal resources.
  • Have the ability to seek help appropriately and use it effectively.
  • Demonstrate the capacity for self-reflection.

TA theory:

  • Articulate an understanding of the theory of TA and its application in practice in their respective fields, as described in the major TA texts, including structural analysis, TA proper, game, racket and script analysis and child development.
  • Describe the application of aspects of all the major approaches to TA and demonstrate knowledge of recent developments, including the similarities and differences between these approaches.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of TA theories of group process.
  • Make interventions, which can be explained according to TA theory and practice.

Field Specific Core Competencies
The core competencies formulated for each field will guide trainers in devising their specialist training curricula.
The term ‘core competencies’ is a description of inter-disciplinary and work-specific knowledge, attitudes, skills, and values required to address the needs of the client and client systems.
The term ‘client system’ refers to the client’s context and the various groups and sub-groups of which the client is part (e.g., the family, extended family, work group, cultural/religious group, etc.).

Counselling Core Competencies

Application of TA Counselling

TA counseling can be broadly used for primary counseling and/or complementary counselling. It can also be used for life coaching. TA counselling is an approach which works with the resources of an individual to manage and cope with their current issues and the focus is on the management of issues. It works with the Integrating Adult of the client.

Primary Counseling: Primary counselling may be done by professional counselors who are practicing therapeutic counselling in private practice, counselling centers, voluntary, nonprofit and profit-oriented organizations, etc. It can be also used for life coaching, behavioral coaching ,executive coaching.

Complementary Counseling
Complementary counselling is the use of counselling skills as a sub-task in various psycho-social and socio-educational professions, as well as in other social, psychological, medical, legal and economic occupations.

Counselling Competencies
The three basic competencies in counselling are: self-competency, social competency and technical competency.

Self-Competency
The ability to be aware of oneself and one’s response to various triggers and manage the experience in the here and now.

Social Competency
The ability to manage individuals and groups in the here and now by collaboration, minimizing conflicts and focusing on the group proceeding to achieve their stated goal.

Technical Competency
To understand TA theory and have the ability to use it for diagnosis and for planning strategy to achieve the contract.

There are also ten specific counselling competencies

1. Knows and understands the Field of Application:

  • Has a clear understanding in their role of counselling in the given context.
  • Understands group dynamics and client systems.
  • Has a commitment to learning and connecting socio cultural influences in the context.

2. Assessment:

  • Is able to diagnose and plan for development and change in the client system.
  • Is aware of the legal basis for contracts in the region.
  • Has awareness of their own strengths and limitations as a TA counsellor.

3. Formulating and Presenting the Counselling Concept:

  • Has the ability to present the counselling issue through TA concepts
  • Is able to make comparisons from various other psychological approaches
  • Is aware when the TA approach is limiting and when it is enabling.

4. Establishing and Maintaining the Counselling Relationship:

  • Knows and applies SAATA principles of professional ethics.
  • Is aware of his/her own frame of reference.
  • Is open and transparent in his/her relationship with clients.
  • Endeavors to adhere to the TA philosophy of Okayness
  • Is able to contain one’s own thoughts, feelings and behavior in relation to the client’s current reality.

5. Analyzing the Counselling Situation:

  • Predominantly uses behavioural, social and historical diagnosis to gather data and record case history.
  • Uses TA concepts to understand and diagnose the counselling situation or issue.
  • Has the ability to define the problem using a positive, hopeful definition to enable the client to look ahead.
  • Is sensitive and aware of the socio cultural influences and impact on the counselor, the client and the client system.

6. Working with Counselling Contracts:

  • Has the ability to make clear TA contracts.
  • Has the ability to make different contracts for different settings.

7. Planning and Making Interventions:

  • Applies TA theory in planning interventions
  • Uses TA tools for assessment on changes
  • Works primarily with the Adult ego state keeping in contact with the Parent and Child.

8. Focusing on Resources:

  • Promotes and highlights the resources that are available to the client.
  • Is in contact with other support institutions, if required, for recommendation.

9. Dealing with Crisis:

  • Is aware of the national requirements in terms of serious crisis like violence, assault and suicide.
  • Makes efficient contracts with clients so that they are able to behave responsibly in case they feel the need to harm self or others.

10. Monitoring Quality and Professional Development:

  • Takes regular supervision from peers and supervisors to develop professional expertise.
  • Will take psychological support when in crisis.
  • Is aware of his or her personal role as a TA counselor in society.
  • Is up to date with current psychological trends and developments.

Education core competencies

A Transactional Analysis educator will demonstrate the ability to

1. General requirements

  • Understand TA theory and its application to education with individuals and groups as appropriate.
  • Assess the client / student and make an informed decision about taking up him/her/them, including up-to-date knowledge of other educational theories and processes.
  • Know the ITAA Code of Ethics and demonstrate ethical and professional competence in practice, including working within the legal requirements governing education in their part of the world.
  • Demonstrate the ability to locate TA within the wider field of education.
  • Have an awareness of the significance and implications of cultural and social diversity and differences within and outside the educational practice.

2. Educator/Learner relationship

  • Manifest a respectful attitude towards self and others.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the uniqueness and importance of the teacher /student relationship in bringing about learning.
  • Demonstrate sensitivity and understanding of the learners, their potentials and scripts, as well as ability to communicate this understanding to them so that the client feels understood.
  • Exhibit a capacity to understand another person’s frame of reference without losing contact with own separate experience.
  • Display ability to self-reflect and to use this self-awareness in appropriate teaching / learning situations.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of developmental issues, transference and countertransference phenomena, and the ability to use constructively in the educational situation.
  • Maintain Ok- Ok stance in the teaching/learning situations.
  • Demonstrate potency, protection, and permission in the educational environment.
  • Demonstrate congruence in interactions.

3. TA theory

  • Articulate an understanding of the basic theory of TA including structural analysis, TA proper, strokes and time structuring, game, racket and script and child development.
  • Describe / Discuss the application of these theoretical concepts in the field of education
  • Demonstrate knowledge of recent developments in Educational TA theory and practice.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of TA theories of group process.
  • Identify parallels and differences between TA theory and other major theories in Educational Psychology and meaningfully connect them.

4. Contracting

  • Express understanding of the process of contracting in educational practice.
  • Justify the need and practice of contracts in the educational practice.
  • Have the capacity to negotiate contracts with institutions and individuals involved in educational activities.

5. Planning and Evaluation: Need assessment & Program Planning

  • Discuss assessment of educational needs and situational diagnosis using any of the TA concepts.
  • Plan educational interventions using TA concepts and tools.
  • Integrate TA concepts into standard educational Practices.
  • Assist the client in recognising and naming their self-limiting patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving and in deciding whether or not change is desired.
  • Conceptualise, using TA theory, in order to develop an overall treatment plan based on the particular issues to be addressed.
  • Ability to incorporate systems of evaluation in any educational program.

6. Implementation and Evaluation: the Teaching / Learning process

  • Demonstrate the capacity to implement programs of educational interventions to suit the needs of different groups or persons anchored in TA theory and philosophy.
  • Show ability to use group dynamics to bring about learning.
  • Demonstrate skill to choose appropriate tools of application from a variety of TA tools and concepts for learners at different stages.
  • Recognise and manage games and other script issues as they arise in the classroom / educational environment in such a way as to effect growth of individuals and group.
  • Show the ability to evaluate the outcomes of the program and plan for subsequent programs.
  • Demonstrate flexibility and creativity to encourage the learning group’s creativity, autonomy and resources.

7. Personal attributes

  • Demonstrate a commitment to the philosophy of TA in such qualities as a belief in the capacity of the learners to take responsibility for themselves, understanding the different ways of being, and responding appropriately facilitate growth and change.
  • Be willing to relate in an ethically intimate manner, including the practice of appropriate self-disclosure.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to ongoing personal and professional development, specifically the development of autonomy, including the capacity for awareness, spontaneity, and intimacy in such a way that teaching and training are free of any pathological script elements .
  • Recognise personal limitations and the limitations of educational practices in the context of the autonomy of learners involved.
  • Use intuition and creativity in the educational environment.
  • Demonstrate the flexibility and adaptation to seek appropriate help use it effectively.
  • Demonstrate the capacity for self-reflection.

Organisations Core Competencies

Transactional analysts in the field of organisations will demonstrate

  • OK ness
  • Ability to think through Transactional Analysis framework
  • Contracting and open communication
  • Ability to define context work with focus of organizational development.
  • Using Ethics
  • Capacity to reflect and intervene the system along with the people
  • That the focus of intervention is fostering autonomy
  • He / she need not be a consultant; he can be a coach, manager, practitioner or trainer

1. Understanding the professional context

  • Understanding change processes in organisations, which take into account the socioeconomic and political reality, frames of reference, systems, culture, relationships, the influence of the organisation on the individual and vice versa;
  • Adequate assessment of own competencies and referral possibilities;
  • Ability to reflect on and teach theoretical models, especially from TA, to address organisational needs;
  • Relation on micro and macro levels, from individuals to the whole organisation, and be able to analyse and consider the whole as well as the parts;
  • Capacity to reflect on these aspects, using TA concepts.

2. People and systems

  • Knowledge and application of models for working with people in systems;
  • Understanding of systemic and personal aspects and reflection on the level and effects of interventions;
  • Dealing with complexity whilst prioritising and focusing on key issues;
  • Managing the boundary between organisational goals and personal needs;
  • Awareness of interactions between subsystems including their own consultant system;
  • Discrimination between individual and organisational learning processes, connecting of these processes with the marketplace, employees and organisation’s survival;
  • Reflection on these aspects, using TA concepts.

3. Contracting and Assessing

  • Select the applicable authority to contract with;
  • Work with multi-level and multi-cornered contracts;
  • Identify the key requirements of the organisation or individual to ensure the appropriate interventions;
  • Accurately identify the range of options for interventions;
  • Identify methods of integrating different learning and assessment opportunities;
  • Select options effectively to promote equality of opportunity and access to achievement;
  • Reflect on these aspects, using TA concepts.

4. Designing, Implementing and Evaluating intervention(s)

  • Achieve learning objectives as contracted;
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the programmes;
  • Consider the balance of content and length of different programmes;
  • Identify possible design problems and generate realistic ideas for overcoming them;
  • Identify ways for evaluating interventions and the rationale for their selection;
  • Explain the scope and purpose of the evaluation;
  • Be aware of the debates in the field concerning evaluation and quality improvement;
  • Clearly identify what will be evaluated and know how to collect the appropriate information;
  • Reflect on these aspects, using TA concepts.

5. Creating a positive, safe learning climate and culture

  • Give a rationale for the style of interaction and how it promotes rapport between all parties;
  • Give consideration to factors which create a safe climate and culture, such as:
  • Actively listening and giving feedback to participants;
  • Encouraging participants to question and discuss the task;
  • Supporting OK-OK principles;
  • Stroking in general;
  • Identifying constraints on communication due to environmental, social and culture issues;
  • Being anti-discriminatory in practice and promote this in ways which are consistent with their role, organisational policy and legislation;
  • Reflect on these aspects, using TA concepts.

6. Managing group dynamics

  • Maintain a balance between group process and the task;
  • Encourage equal participation;
  • Identify and work with those avoiding the task;
  • Challenge stereotyping of individual roles and behaviour in the group and constructively
  • use this to enhance learning;
  • Show a knowledge of different types of groups;
  • Show their awareness of key theoretical models of group work;
  • Form, maintain and close groups;
  • Recognize and work with power and authority in groups;
  • Reflect on these aspects, using TA concepts.

7. Evaluating own practice

  • Evaluate their own practice against set goals and criteria;
  • Be aware of own impact on others;
  • Accept feedback in a positive manner and assess it for validity and importance;
  • Set clear and realistic goals and targets for their own development in order of priority;
  • Reflect on these aspects, using TA concepts.

8. Addressing ethical issues

  • Show an awareness of ambiguities of boundary issues when working in organisations;
  • Be able to discuss and show evidence of ethical behaviour in organisations and the use and abuse of the consultant/practitioner’s role vis-à-vis the different roles in the organisation;
  • Show that she/he has appropriately set and maintained boundaries to information shared by management about employees or by a coachee with the consultant;
  • Follow and reflect the Code of Ethics

Psychotherapy core competencies

A Transactional Analysis psychotherapist will demonstrate the following abilities:

1. General requirements

  • Understanding of TA theory and its application to psychotherapy with individuals and with couples, families and groups as appropriate.
  • Ability to assess the client and make an informed decision about taking him or her into treatment, including up-to-date knowledge of other treatment possibilities, the ability to convey different options to the client, and the willingness to assist in choosing how to proceed.
  • Knowledge of the ITAA/SAATA Code of Ethics and demonstrate ethical and professional competence in practice, including working within the legal requirements governing psychotherapy in the region of practice.
  • Ability to locate TA within the wider field of psychotherapy.
  • Awareness of the significance and implications of cultural and social diversity and difference within and outside the consulting room.

2. Personal attributes

  • Demonstrate a commitment to the philosophy of TA in such qualities as a belief in the capacity of the individual to take responsibility for him/herself, understanding an individual’s ways of being, and responding to an individual’s ability to grow and change.
  • Have a willingness to be available for ethically intimate contact, including the practice of appropriate self-disclosure.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to ongoing personal and professional development, specifically the development of autonomy, including the capacity for awareness, spontaneity, and intimacy such that therapeutic interventions are not affected by script decisions.
  • Recognise one’s own limitations and the limitations of psychotherapeutic practice.
  • Use intuition and creativity in response to the therapeutic situation.
  • Show understanding of strengths and limitations of personal resources.
  • Have the ability to seek help appropriately and use it effectively.
  • Demonstrate the capacity for self-reflection.

3. TA theory

  • Articulate an understanding of the basic theory of TA and its application in clinical practice as described in the major TA texts, including structural analysis, TA proper, game, racket and script analysis and child development.
  • Describe the application of aspects of all the major approaches to TA and demonstrate knowledge of recent developments, including the similarities and differences between these approaches.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of TA theories of group process.
  • Make interventions, which can be explained according to TA theory and practice.

4. Therapeutic relationship

  • Respectful attitude towards self and others.
  • Understanding of the importance of the therapeutic relationship in effecting change, its nature, and its difference from any other relationship.
  • Empathic sensitivity and understanding of the client, his or her symptoms and self-limiting script, as well as showing the ability to communicate this understanding to the client in such a way that the client feels understood.
  • Capacity to understand another person’s phenomenology and bracket his/her own frame of reference without losing contact with his/her own separate experience.
  • Ability to self-reflect and to use this self-awareness in appropriate self-disclosure.
  • Understanding of developmental issues, transference and countertransference phenomena, and the ability to use TA to address it successfully. This will include the willingness to allow transference to develop in the client/therapist relationship and to handle the client’s regressive states appropriately and therapeutically. It will also include understanding his/her own countertransference and the limits it may create, as well as the ability to use it constructively.
  • Respect to self and others, including showing sensitivity for different frames of reference, cultures, and social norms as well as taking account of the impact on the relationship of these differences in the consulting room.
  • Demonstrate potency, protection, and permission and show an understanding of their importance.
  • Congruence in their interactions.

5. Contracting

  • Show an understanding of the necessity for a clear business contract as well as the ability to negotiate contracts.
  • Have the capacity to negotiate with a client in order to arrive at a shared understanding of the work to be undertaken and to formulate an appropriate treatment contract. This will include understanding and respecting the difference between contracts for social control and contracts for autonomy, which allow for intrapsychic and interpersonal change involving dismantling limiting scripts and the resolution of impasses.

6. Planning: assessment and treatment direction

  • Describe a comprehensive system of assessment and diagnosis using standard TA concepts.
  • Show an understanding of the psychiatric diagnostic systems used in the country in which practice takes place (e.g., DSM, ICD).
  • Make meaning of a client’s experiences using standard TA concepts in a way that maintains the I’m OK – You’re OK attitude.
  • Show an awareness of and have the ability to respond to risk and harm factors for self, client, and others.
  • Assist the client in recognising and naming their self-limiting patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving and in deciding whether or not change is desired.
  • Conceptualise, using TA theory, in order to develop an overall treatment plan based on the particular issues to be addressed.

7. Implementation: the psychotherapeutic process

  • Show the capacity to make accurate phenomenological observations of the client and use those as the basis for a therapeutic hypothesis that is linked to TA theory and philosophy.
  • Show ability to use group process as an effective intervention.
  • Select interventions appropriate to the stage of treatment and the treatment contract.
  • Demonstrate the ability to effect timely interventions.
  • Recognise and assess script issues as they arise within the session and address them appropriately according to the stage of treatment (for example, script signals, game invitations, discounts, driver behaviour).
  • Show the ability to evaluate the effect of an intervention and use that information to update hypotheses and select subsequent interventions.
  • Encourage the client’s autonomy and resources.

SAATA Advanced Diploma Written Examination

Assessment Calendar

  • The schedule for the Advanced Diploma written exam to be submitted, at least six months prior to the next SAATA event, keeping the following in mind:
  • Once the written exam has been submitted, 60 days is allowed for it to be marked, once the examiner has been identified.
  • Oral exams will be organised just before National events like Conferences, Multi Level Learning, etc., when there have been sufficient applications received from Trainees from the SAATA region
  • Once the exam has been passed, the application for the Oral Exam needs to reach the VP – Training & Examinations at least 90 days before the Oral exams.

Purpose of the Advanced Diploma written Examination

The purpose of the written examination is to demonstrate that the candidate has integrated the core competencies of his chosen field of application and how she/he works effectively and ethically as a theoretically based transactional analyst.

Overview of written examination

The written examination is on the similar lines as the CTA examination, ITAA and consists of 4 sections. The only difference in the SAATA Advanced Diploma is that in Section D, the candidate has to answer only 3 questions instead of 6.

Part A: Self-portrayal of the candidate and his or her work as a transactional analyst.
Part B: A report on the learning experience and personal development gained during TA training.
Part C: The client case or project study.
Part D: Theory and literature. The candidate is required to answer three questions on TA theory and practice.

The written examination can be written in any language for which examiners are available.

Anonymity
The written examination should be anonymous. There should be no indication in the text that might allow the candidate, the supervisor or trainer to be identified. This requirement is to protect the candidate. If the candidate identifies his/her training institute or trainer in the written exam, it will be automatically returned to the candidate. The identity of any individual client or organisation used as examples to illustrate practice must be disguised. The examiner’s identity is also maintained anonymous.

Total length for the Advanced Diploma Written Exam

The word limit is 18000 words, broken up as follows
Part A – 4000
Part B – 2000
Part C – 8000
Part D – 4000

Scoring
Part A – 30 marks (Professional Setting & Development through TA Training)
Part B – 15 Marks (Personal Journey)
Part C – 70 marks (Client Case Study)
Part D – 35 marks (Theory: 3 questions)
Total – 150 Marks to be converted to Percentage

Parts A, B, C and D of the written examination should be answered.

For Part D, the examiner marks for 75 (i.e. 25 marks per answer) and adds only half of this score to the final total, amounting close to 35 weightage for Part D.

An overall percentage score of 100% would indicate a faultless pass. The written examination will be deferred if the total score is less than 65% or if it does not meet the requirements outlined in the guidelines.

Field of specialization

The written examination must be within the candidate’s declared field of specialization. The written examination marker will decide if this is the case. If the marker is unsure of this, they will refer the written examination back to the VP-T&E for a decision.

Language and translation
The written examination can be written in any language for which there are examiners available. There is no requirement to translate it for the oral examination.

Presentation

  • The written examination should be professionally presented, i.e.,
  • Word-processed, preferably as a PDF file (an MS-Word file is acceptable),
  • On A4 or (US) letter page size,
  • Each page with 2.54 cm or one inch margins,
  • All pages numbered consecutively throughout the entire document,
  • Double-spaced throughout, except that
  • Bibliography and any transcripts may be single-spaced,
  • Presentation of the bibliography strictly following the TAJ format,
  • Referencing and quotations within the text giving the relevant page number(s) within the publication.

Note that if the submission does not follow these requirements, it will be returned to the candidate for correction.

For Questions regarding each section, refer to the ITAA Training & Examinations Handbook, as per the link below:

https://www.itaaworld.org/sites/default/files/itaa-pdfs/train-hndbk/ITAA%20Train-Exam%20Hndbk%20Sec%2008%20CTA%20Written%20v.2013.pdf

Marking procedures

1. Evaluation is carried out by the candidate’s primary supervisor, in the form of an appraisal to prepare the written examination in the appropriate format and of required standard.
2. When it is in their opinion of passing standard, the candidate sends to the SAATA office

  • The application (Appendix No…) along with
  • The examination fee and
  • An endorsement by the supervisor (Appendix No..) that the requirements of hours and other criteria are met
  • Log of all training, supervision and other relevant hours
  • Proof of current and continuous SAATA membership for at least a total of three years.

3. The candidate pays the reader’s fee directly to the SAATA office / or a person designated by the SAATA office, who then sends it to the examiner.
4. The candidate sends a soft copy of the examination to the VP-T&E or a person designated by the SAATA office, who then sends it to the examiner.
5. The examiner marks the written examination based on the criteria specified above and the detailed rubric provided (Appendix IV). The Consolidated Mark Statement (Appendix V) and feedback are e-mailed to the VP-T&E, with a copy to the SAATA office (exams@saata.org)
6. If the examination is passed, the candidate will be eligible to appear for the Advanced Diploma Oral Examination. On successful passing of the Oral Examination, the candidate is awarded the Advanced Diploma by SAATA.
7. If the examination is deferred, the examination is rewritten, using the feedback from the examiner, and the above steps 3 to 6 are followed after payment of the resubmission fee.
8. Alternately, the candidate may apply for a revaluation along with the relevant fee.
9. After revaluation, the examiner sends the evaluation and feedback via an email to the candidate.

Computation of marks after revaluation

  • If the difference of marks awarded by the two examiners is less than 20 then the average mark is considered to declare the candidate passed or deferred.
  • If the difference in marks is greater than 20, the examination is sent for revaluation to a third examiner. No extra fee is collected from the candidate.
  • The third examiner sends the evaluation and feedback to the SAATA office
  • The candidate is declared passed if any of the two examiners have awarded 65% or above.

Fee Structure

Application Fee Examiner’s fee
Advanced Diploma Written Examination Rs.3000 Rs.4000
Re-submission with minor changes/ clarification required by examiner Rs. 200 Rs.3000

 

Re-valuation Rs. 1000 Rs.3000
Advanced Diploma Oral Examination Rs. 5000

Scoring for the Written Examination

Note: the scoring criteria of Sections A, B & D are common for all the four fields and the criteria are given below.

Section C (Client case study is field specific and has been outlined below for each field separately).

Section A: Professional Self Portrayal (Criteria applicable for all fields)

Total Marks: 30

# Criteria Max. Marks Marks

Awarded

1. Understanding of the Social, Cultural & Professional Context 10
2. Awareness of self as a TA Professional 10
3. The impact of TA Training & Supervision in Professional Development 5
4. Ethical Position 5

Section B: Personal Learning & Growth (Criteria applicable for all fields)

Total Marks: 15

# Criteria Max. Marks Marks

Awarded

1. Personal Growth & Development mainly using the language of TA. 5
2. How TA training has helped personal growth 5
3. Role of Training & Supervision on self in influencing identity of the practitioner in the chosen field 5

Section C: Case Study (Counselling) Total Marks: 70

No. Criteria Max. Marks Marks

Awarded

1. Client Context / History 5
2. Assessment & Diagnosis using the TA framework 8
3. Alternate Approach 4
4. Contracting 8
5. Treatment Planning 5
6. Counseling Process:
7. (a) Interventions 8
8. (b) Working with the Unconscious / Transference 7
9. Prognosis 5
10. Use of Supervision 4
11. Self-Reflection 4
12. Documentation 4
13. Overall Demonstration of Professional Competence

(Creativity, potency, coherence, cogent presentation, use of research, etc.)

8

Section C: Case Study (Education) Total Marks: 70

No. Criteria Max. Marks Marks

Awarded

1. Client Context 4
2. Needs Assessment using the TA framework 8
3. Awareness of alternate methods 4
4. Contracting 6
5. Project Planning 6
6. Education Process:
7. (a) Interventions 8
8. (b) Creativity 5
9. (c)Feedbacks 3
10. Future plan 4
11. Use of Supervision 4
12. Self-Reflection 4
13. Documentation 4
14. Overall Demonstration of Professional Competence

(Creativity, potency, coherence, cogent presentation, use of research, etc.)

10

Section C: Client Case Study (Organisational) Total Marks: 70

# Client case study Criteria Max.

Marks

Marks

Awarded

1. Client context , organisational settings 2
2. Need analysis 5
3. Using TA concepts and methods (36)
4. (a)Analysis, planning, considerations, methods, strategies 4
5. (b)Contracting, multi-level/other agreement 5
6. (c) Interventions towards fulfillment of contract 5
7. (d)Measures for evaluation of the process of change 5
8. (e)Diagram of the plan of implementation 3
9. (f)Processes summary corresponding to changes using TA concepts 5
10. (g)Summary of accomplishment of contract, group dynamics, group process 5
11. (h)Future plan of actions and recommendation 4
12. Relevant concepts other than TA considered in the overall case 5
13. Learning during the process and changes incorporate 7
14. Overall Demonstration of Professional Competence

(Creativity, potency, coherence, cogent presentation, use of research, systemic approach, etc.)

10
15. Referencing 5

Section C: Client Case Study (Psychotherapy) Total Marks: 70

No. Criteria Max. Marks Marks

Awarded

1. Client Context / History 4
2. Assessment & Diagnosis using the TA framework 8
3. Differential Diagnosis 3
4. Contracting 7
5. Treatment Planning 6
6. Psychotherapy Process:
7. (a) Interventions 8
8. (b) Working with the unconscious/Transference 6
9. Prognosis & Cure 5
10. Use of Supervision 6
11. Self-Reflection 5
12. Documentation 4
13. Overall Demonstration of Professional Competence

(Creativity, potency, coherence, cogent presentation, use of research, etc.)

8

Part D: Theory (3 ques to be answered) Marks: 75 (25 per answer)

(Criteria applicable for all fields)

# Criteria Max. Marks Marks awarded
i. Introduction:

Brief introduction to what is to be covered

Reasons for choice of question

3
ii. Theoretical understanding of TA

Definition, description, diagrams and explanation of concepts

Reasons for usefulness of the concept

Linkage between understanding and practice

Examples from work, with both the case study client and other clients.

Connecting to other theories

10
iii. Overall – answers to demonstrate:

Consistency, thereby illustrating a consistent theoretical approach.

how the candidate has worked ethically

sensitivity of the social & cultural contexts

coherence in presentation

appropriate and correct referencing

Flexibility and creativity

9
iv. Presentation

Coherent, creative, concise and well organized

 

3

(Note: Some sections have been adapted from the ITAA Training & Examinations Handbook and customised to suit the SAATA region)

Overview of the Advanced Diploma oral examination in Transactional Analysis

The oral examination is based on the lines as the CTA examination, ITAA.

For the guidelines of the Oral Examination, for the Advanced Diploma in Transactional Analysis, refer to the ITAA Training & Examinations Handbook, as per the link below

https://www.itaaworld.org/sites/default/files/itaa-pdfs/train-hndbk/ITAA%20Train-Exam%20Hndbk%20Sec%2009%20CTA%20Oral%20v.2013.pdf

The difference in the SAATA Advanced Diploma Oral Exam is that:

  1. The examiners keep in mind that the candidate is evaluated on the basis of the Core Competencies and the level that has been outlined in the Advanced Diploma Handbook.
  2. Only 2 tapes are required, demonstrating 5 minute segments of work with clients. There is no requirement for a group tape in the Counselling and Psychotherapy fields for the SAATA Advanced Diploma Exam.